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Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond
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Guns, Germs, and Steel

The Fates of Human Societies

$35.00 USD

Get for $14.99 with membership
Narrator Doug Ordunio
Length 16 hours 19 minutes
Language English
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Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Guns, Germs and Steel examines the rise of civilization and the issues its development has raised throughout history.
 
Having done field work in New Guinea for more than 30 years, Jared Diamond presents the geographical and ecological factors that have shaped the modern world. From the viewpoint of an evolutionary biologist, he highlights the broadest movements both literal and conceptual on every continent since the Ice Age, and examines societal advances such as writing, religion, government, and technology.  Diamond also dissects racial theories of global history, and the resulting work—Guns, Germs and Steel—is a major contribution to our understanding the evolution of human societies.

Jared Diamond is a professor of geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. The recipient of numerous awards, he has published more than 200 articles in such prestigious magazines as Discover and Nature.

Doug Ordunio is a professional singer and narrator. He has performed with the Duke Ellington Band, the New York City Opera, and the Greek Theater Opera. His narrating credits include Crashing Through by Robert Kurson; Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond; and How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci by Michael J. Gelb.

Jared Diamond is a professor of geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. The recipient of numerous awards, he has published more than 200 articles in such prestigious magazines as Discover and Nature.

Doug Ordunio is a professional singer and narrator. He has performed with the Duke Ellington Band, the New York City Opera, and the Greek Theater Opera. His narrating credits include Crashing Through by Robert Kurson; Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond; and How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci by Michael J. Gelb.

Gift memberships

Gift audiobooks to anyone in the world from the comfort of your home. You choose the membership (3, 6, or 12 months/credits), your gift recipient picks their own audiobooks, and local bookstores is supported by your purchase.

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Reviews

Artful, informative, and delightful.... There is nothing like a radically new angle of vision for bringing out unsuspected dimensions of a subject, and that is what Jared Diamond has done.—William H. McNeil, New York Review of Books

An ambitious, highly important book.—James Shreeve, New York Times Book Review

A book of remarkable scope, a history of the world in less than 500 pages which succeeds admirably, where so many others have failed, in analyzing some of the basic workings of culture process.... One of the most important and readable works on the human past published in recent years.—Colin Renfrew, Nature

The scope and the explanatory power of this book are astounding.—The New Yorker

No scientist brings more experience from the laboratory and field, none thinks more deeply about social issues or addresses them with greater clarity, than Jared Diamond as illustrated by Guns, Germs, and Steel. In this remarkably readable book he shows how history and biology can enrich one another to produce a deeper understanding of the human condition. —Edward O. Wilson, Pellegrino University Professor, Harvard University

Serious, groundbreaking biological studies of human history only seem to come along once every generation or so. . . . Now [Guns, Germs, and Steel] must be added to their select number. . . . Diamond meshes technological mastery with historical sweep, anecdotal delight with broad conceptual vision, and command of sources with creative leaps. No finer work of its kind has been published this year, or for many past. —Martin Sieff, Washington Times

[Diamond] is broadly erudite, writes in a style that pleasantly expresses scientific concepts in vernacular American English, and deals almost exclusively in questions that should interest everyone concerned about how humanity has developed. . . . [He] has done us all a great favor by supplying a rock-solid alternative to the racist answer. . . . A wonderfully interesting book.—Alfred W. Crosby, Los Angeles Times

An epochal work. Diamond has written a summary of human history that can be accounted, for the time being, as Darwinian in its authority.—Thomas M. Disch, The New Leader Expand reviews