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Win Me Something by Kyle Lucia Wu
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Win Me Something

$15.26 USD

Retail price (USD): $16.95

Discount: 10%

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Narrator Natalie Naudus
Length 6 hours 37 minutes
Language English
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A perceptive and powerful debut of identity and belonging―of a young woman determined to be seen.

Willa Chen has never quite fit in. Growing up as a biracial Chinese American girl in New Jersey, Willa felt both hypervisible and unseen, too Asian to fit in at her mostly white school, and too white to speak to the few Asian kids around. After her parents’ early divorce, they both remarried and started new families, and Willa grew up feeling outside of their new lives, too.

For years, Willa does her best to stifle her feelings of loneliness, drifting through high school and then college as she tries to quiet the unease inside her. But when she begins working for the Adriens―a wealthy white family in Tribeca―as a nanny for their daughter, Bijou, Willa is confronted with all of the things she never had. As she draws closer to the family and eventually moves in with them, Willa finds herself questioning who she is, and revisiting a childhood where she never felt fully at home.

Self-examining and fraught with the emotions of a family who fails and loves in equal measure, Win Me Something is a nuanced coming-of-age debut about the irreparable fissures between people, and a young woman who asks what it really means to belong, and how she might begin to define her own life.

Kyle Lucia Wu has received the Asian American Writers' Workshop Margins Fellowship and residencies from the Millay Colony, the Byrdcliffe Colony, Plympton's Writing Downtown Residency, and the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center. She is the Programs & Communications Director at Kundiman and has taught creative writing at Fordham University and the New School. She was born in New Jersey and lives in Los Angeles.

Natalie Naudus is a Taiwanese American actor who started out as an opera singer, with a master of music from the University of North Texas. She has a passion for stories and characters, and her language training has allowed her to develop a skill for accents and convincing foreign language dialogue. She excels at unique character voices and passionate storytelling. She lives in Virginia with her husband and two daughters.

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Reviews

“Tenderly and masterfully reveals the fury, hope, and longing that come with trying to be seen in a world that never looks for you.”

“Wu’s beautifully observed coming-of-age tale is a poignant and lyrical meditation on navigating the world with a fragmented sense of self.”

“Through the characters’ kinships—some familial, some chosen—Wu brilliantly lays out the complicated dynamics of love, belonging, and care that exist within all relationships.”

“A resonant knockout.”

“Each sentence unfolds like a miracle.”

“Taut, engrossing, and masterfully observed.”

“A sad, funny, and tender coming-of-age story.”

“Explores loneliness, uncertainty, and a singular, persistent question—where do I truly belong?”

“Impressive…Expect subtle surprises as Willa’s relationships evolve in a satisfying accumulation of carefully drawn small moments that build toward her understanding, even acceptance, of both an imperfect world and herself.”

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