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Bestselling Audiobooks

The top 100 audiobooks on Libro.fm based on sales from our 1,000+ partner bookstore locations.

Last Updated •
  1. The Dutch House

    “The Dutch House is an engrossing story that spans over 50 years. It is about a house and the memories that it holds. The story revolves around Danny and Maeve, a brother and sister who love each other deeply - more than any other person including Danny's wife. They share a sad childhood in which their Mother disappears with very little explanation. They are brought up by their distant father who loves their home, The Dutch House, more than his children or his second wife. When he dies suddenly in his 50's, the second wife takes everything and throws Danny and Maeve out of the house. The siblings manage and continue to be each other's lifeline. I enjoyed this book tremendously and developed great affection for the siblings, even with their complex, dysfunctional dynamics. An added bonus: Tom Hanks reads the story with plenty of heart and soul.”

    Buttonwood Books and Toys image Melinda, Buttonwood Books and Toys
  2. #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • In her most revealing and powerful memoir yet, the beloved activist, speaker, and bestselling author of Love Warrior and Carry On, Warrior explores the joy and peace we discover when we stop striving to meet the expectations of the world, and start trusting the voice deep within us.

    Untamed will liberate...
    Read More »

  3. Talking to Strangers

    “Fascinating! How and why we so frequently misinterpret the words, intentions, and sincerity of strangers. Computers, analyzing only information, are far better at judging someone’s guilt or innocence (and future behavior) than judges, psychologists, and witnesses. Based on our preconceptions of how people should behave in certain situations, the guilty often appear innocent and the innocent look like cold-hearted liars. They’re mismatched. Their outer reactions, facial expressions, and behavior don’t match our socially biased expectations. But wait, how do culture, alcohol, or surroundings further muck up our interactions? That’s just the tip of this Gladwellian iceberg.”

    Watermark Books image Robin, Watermark Books
  4. Such a Fun Age

    “When I attempted to write a review for Such a Fun Age, I was at a loss for words. How could I encapsulate how Kiley Reid’s startling debut perfectly captured what it means to be a woman? The societal pressure, the self-doubt, the perseverance, the constant comparison — all of it was perfectly represented through Reid’s two wonderfully flawed and captivating leads. Follow Emira and Alix, two women on seemingly incongruous paths who find themselves searching for purpose and an authentic sense of self. Such a Fun Age tackles complex issues — race, gender, economic status, and the intersection of them all — yet remains accessible. You will not want to put this book down; when you do, you’ll be itching to pick it back up again.”

    Flyleaf Books image Gennifer Eccles, Flyleaf Books
  5. By Kevin Wilson / Narrated by Marin Ireland

    Nothing to See Here

    “I never expected to enjoy this book as much as I did. I broke my cardinal rule of only listening to books while I walk. From the moment I turned this book on I did not turn it off until I finished it. I don't know whether I would have liked the book as much if I read it. The narrator did an outstanding job reading. I highly recommend this delightful book.”

    Buttonwood Books and Toys image Melinda, Buttonwood Books and Toys
  6. Educated

    “I loved this book! Tara Westover's memoir is the kind that sounds like it should be a novel—and this book reads like one in the best way—and I think I found myself gasping and covering my mouth about once per chapter. Westover describes her upbringing in a fundamentalist Mormon, survivalist, anti-government, anti-medicine family, enduring neglect and abuse and never attending school, in a way that still somehow manages to make her family members seem sympathetic despite their actions. She is honest about her early beliefs and conflicts and addresses her own lapses in memory throughout the book, and when she finally leaves home to go to college and beyond, you can't help but cheer for her. Julia Whelan does a fantastic job narrating the book, as well, giving each character a distinct personality, but in a way that isn't distracting to the story being told. Her voice is alternately innocent and chilling and gives an added depth to a fascinating story.”

    Bank Square Books image Elissa, Bank Square Books
  7. Where the Crawdads Sing

    Where the Crawdads Sing is a stunning and beautiful novel that readers will want to simultaneously savor and devour with every luxurious word. You’ll hear the gulls cry on the beach through these pages, you’ll see the light flickering through the marsh trees, you’ll smell the homemade grits sizzling on the stovetop. Your heart will ache for the lonely marsh girl and your wheels will start turning when a body is discovered, but you’ll never regret reading this gorgeous novel.”

    Bethany Beach Books image Amanda Zirn, Bethany Beach Books
  8. The Splendid and the Vile

    “Larson does a splendid job again of creating the personal story out of a larger historical event. Here he concentrates on the Churchills and the two years of the London blitz. By using diaries and letters, he tells of the immense loss of life and property. He also gives voice to the great spirit of the people who endured this. We are transported to 10 Downing Street and the official weekend home of the prime minister where meetings, meals, parties, and intrigue abound.”

    Blue Willow Bookshop image Valerie, Blue Willow Bookshop
  9. By Celeste Ng / Narrated by Jennifer Lim

    If you enjoyed We All Love the Beautiful Girls, then you’ll love Little Fires Everywhere.

    “Readers who enjoyed the run away hit Little Fires Everywhere will devour this new, slightly edgier fiction release, We All Love the Beautiful Girls.”

    Anderson's Bookshop image Katie, Anderson's Bookshop
  10. Circe

    “This remarkable journey into mythology brings the ancient gods directly and viscerally into the present. Circe is a perfect mashup of elegant language, glorious storytelling, and exquisitely modern sensibilities. Miller's telling left me awed and moved by Circe and her story, all while wishing I could invite her over for a glass of wine on the porch. How this amazing author so perfectly melds the human and the divine, creating a story both immediate and epic, is dazzling.”

    Beth Albrecht image Beth Albrecht, The Magic Tree Bookstore
  11. The Starless Sea

    “Rarely is a book such an absolute feast—for the senses, for the intellect, and, above all, for the soul. Morgenstern dazzles in her latest novel, an intricately wrought tale populated by lovers, mystery, and sumptuous magic. The Starless Sea is an ode to book lovers everywhere, reanimating the excitement as well as the pure possibility felt when reading books like Harry Potter or The Lord of the Rings for the first time. I am reminded of the famous C.S. Lewis quote, ‘One day, you’ll be old enough to read fairytales again.’ When that day comes, The Starless Sea will be waiting for you.”

    Brazos Bookstore image Laura Graveline, Brazos Bookstore
  12. In Five Years

    “Sometimes a book comes along that is exactly what you need at the moment. That's what “In Five Years” was for me last week. Partly because it’s a love story with a bit of magic. Partly because I adored the friendship between the two very different main characters: pragmatic Dannie and whimsical Dannie. This book gave me all the feels, a few laughs and maybe a few tears. It is Me Before You by Jojo Moyes meets Something Borrowed by Emily Giffin. Best paired with whitefish salad on a bagel. Seasoned Broadway veteran Megan Hilty (who also played Ivy Lynn in Smash on NBC) narrates the audiobook, and I loved her performance.”

    Aesop's Fable image Tara, Aesop's Fable
  13. The Silent Patient

    The Silent Patient is an outstanding thriller centered on a spellbinding mystery with a shocking twist; in other words, you are going to love this book. Alicia was a talented painter and devoted wife until the night she was discovered still as a statue and covered in blood, having apparently killed her husband. The answer as to why has remained locked inside of Alicia, who stops speaking following the murder. Six years later, Theo, a young psychologist, is determined to get the mysterious Alicia to spill all of her secrets. The final surprise will have you rethinking every riveting scene in this brilliant debut.”

    Book Passage image Luisa Smith, Book Passage
  14. Becoming

    “I adore our former president and I miss him. Yet I cannot help but be ecstatic that Michelle is coming out with a book about her own life so that I can learn more about this powerful, intelligent, and singularly awesome woman. Barack would be the first to say that his wife is a superstar, and I can’t wait to get my hands on Becoming to read about her in her own words.”

    Bookshop Santa Cruz image Jax, Bookshop Santa Cruz
  15. Daisy Jones & The Six

    “Written as an oral history chronicling the astronomic rise and fall of a Fleetwood Mac-esque rock band in the late '70s, DAISY JONES & THE SIX is a gorgeous, dishy, and profound book that I devoured in something like two days. The story races like gangbusters and cuts straight to the hearts and souls of the superbly-drawn characters, who all have a lot to say about music, creativity, fame, family, love, collaboration, and (of course) sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll. Definitely one of my favorite books of the year so far!”

    One More Page image Rebecca, One More Page
  16. A new rip-roaring essay collection from the smart, edgy, hilarious, unabashedly raunchy, and bestselling Samantha Irby.

    Irby is forty, and increasingly uncomfortable in her own skin despite what Inspirational Instagram Infographics have promised her. She has left her job as a receptionist at a veterinary clinic, has published successful books and... Read More »

  17. American Dirt (Oprah's Book Club)

    “American Dirt can only be described as riveting. I could not stop listening to this compulsive, spine-tingling story. I positively loved this book. There is not a dull moment in it. I highly recommend listening to this book when you have some time on your hands because you won't want to turn it off. The narrator of this book is one of the best that I have listened to. She has a pleasing voice, a lovely accent, and gives just enough drama to the words.”

    Buttonwood Books and Toys image Melinda, Buttonwood Books and Toys
  18. By Ronan Farrow / Narrated by Ronan Farrow

    Catch and Kill

    “A timely, incredibly important account of the difficulties Farrow faced at NBC while working on the Weinstein expose, which he took to the New Yorker and subsequently won a Pulitzer for. The audiobook is grippingly read by Farrow (though the accents he attempts are... let's go with 'confusing'). It's upsetting, sure, but heartening to see the exhaustive research and the very clearly laid-out account of how Farrow had to work against the very powerful high-profile members of the media establishment--including his own bosses--not only because of Weinstein's well-oiled intimidation machine but also as part of those figures attempting to cover up their own histories of being harassers. Highly recommend this important piece of current events journalism, which reads like a thriller novel.”

    A Room Of One's Own Bookstore image Gretchen, A Room Of One's Own Bookstore
  19. "Mandel's gift is to weave realism out of extremity. She plants her flag where the ordinary and the astonishing meet, where everyday people pause to wonder how, exactly, it came to this. She is our bard of waking up in the wrong time line."--Katy Waldman, The New Yorker

    A New York Times, Entertainment Weekly, Newsweek, Bustle, Buzzfeed,...
    Read More »

  20. Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You

    “Just when you think you know everything about the history of black people in America, along comes this book. It completely shook up what I thought I knew about the struggle for freedom and equality. I discovered some of my "heroes" didn't always fight the good fight and learned a few new names of those who did what they could for the cause. I am not the same person I was before I listened to this book. If everyone who encounters this book can say the same, maybe that will be the beginning of something good. Bravo Jason and Ibram! ”

    M. Judson Booksellers image Felicia, M. Judson Booksellers
  21. Calypso

    “David Sedaris’s storytelling capabilities are only strengthened through the audiobook, in which the author himself leads us through his gut-busting tale of his vacations in beach homes. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, and then you’ll listen to the audiobook forty times over again.”

    Parnassus Books image Ella, Parnassus Books
  22. The House in the Cerulean Sea

    “There aren't many books that can leave you wishing you were a parentless magical child feared by the rest of the society. But with characters like the ones in The House in the Cerulean Sea, you can't help but wish you belonged to such a wonderful, magical family. And the dialogue! You will not be able to drive while listening to it because you'll be laughing way too hard!”

    Belmont Books image Chris, Belmont Books
  23. Eight Perfect Murders

    “Malcolm Kershaw is an unassuming bookseller who once wrote a list of the eight most perfect literary murders. He is surprised when the FBI shows up at his door and explains that someone is using this list and recreating the murders. With perfect pacing and shocking twists, this is a murder mystery with a classic feel that will leave you questioning how well you can know anyone. It will also add eight more books to your to-be-read pile as you will immediately need to read all the books on the perfect murder list!”

    Dog Ear Books image Carrie Deming, Dog Ear Books
  24. Oona Out of Order

    “Oona Out of Order is a work of fiction that genuinely encouraged me to reflect upon my own mortality and the trajectory of my life. Oona wakes up on her birthday every year in a different part of her life. The difficulty this imposes is fascinating. Pop culture and music is ever-present, as Oona is a musician and chapter titles are taken from song titles or lyrics. What would it be to live your life out of order? To instinctively want to second guess and redo what you saw as failures? At the heart, Oona Out of Order is about mastering the art of living in the moment and it is a terribly fun romp.”

    Avid Bookshop image Rachel, Avid Bookshop
  25. The Giver of Stars

    “In the late 1930s, the Works Progress Administration developed a number of projects intended to provide employment opportunities for unemployed artists, writers, and craftsmen. One of those projects was the Pack Horse Library Initiative, in which mounted horsewomen picked their way along snowy hillsides and through muddy creeks with a simple goal: to deliver reading material to Kentucky’s isolated mountain communities. In The Giver of Stars, Moyes has brought to life the amazing, funny, adventurous stories of a few of these trailblazing women. Historical fiction lovers will devour this story of a little-known piece of U.S. history.”

    The Country Bookshop image Angie Tally, The Country Bookshop
  26. From rising comedy star Cameron Esposito, a memoir that is "as hilarious and honest as she is on the stage," tackling the big issues explored in her comedy, including gender, sexuality and feminism - and how her Catholic childhood prepared her for a career as an outspoken lesbian comedian in ways the Pope could never have imagined (Abby... Read More »

  27. The Only Plane in the Sky

    “I absolutely believe this book should be listened to, instead of read. Each of the interviews and testimonies has a different voice, making this experience extremely intimate. I thought I knew. I had no idea. My memory is made up of all the big moments shared by the news. Planes, towers, explosions, the Pentagon, flight 93. All Images, experienced vicariously. Graff has collected first-hand accounts of 9/11 and woven them into a chronological masterpiece. I am awestruck by the tiniest of details, observations, moments. The following muffled silence, like that after a heavy snowfall. Streets filled with women’s shoes. (Think about it.) These testimonies fill in the spaces between the big images burned into our national psyche. These voices make it real. Make it human. Make it us.”

    Watermark Books image Robin, Watermark Books
  28. The Water Dancer (Oprah's Book Club)

    “Ta-Nehisi Coates understands something big and he understands it better than anyone else right now. The Water Dancer led me on a journey up and down the landscape of American slavery with a narrative that feels like The Book of Exodus meets, well, Ta-Nehisi Coates. Over 400 pages I have cried, I have laughed, I have been educated, and I have been enlightened. Coates writes with an honesty that can only come from a sublime, even spiritual, understanding of the souls of the white man and the black man in America. Written with poignancy and humanity, The Water Dancer left me stunned but clear-headed, like I had just been woken up from a deep, dream-filled sleep.”

    Norris Rettiger image Norris Rettiger, Lemuria Bookstore
  29. City of Girls

    City of Girls is a champagne cocktail, a tonic for anything that ails you, and the summer read you can’t miss! Vivian Morris, an upper-class, 19-year-old college dropout, finds herself in the chaotic New York City theater world of the 1940s. What ensues is a story full of sex, glamour, and witty one-liners that spans decades. All those who led a heedless youth or wish they had will fall for this book about growing into the person you’ve always wanted to be. Gilbert has written a glittering piece of fiction that subtly delivers wisdom about the nature of human connection and leaves the reader braver, freer, and, at least for the moment, happier.”

    Books & Books image Caroline McGregor, Books & Books
  30. Valentine

    “This story has just... I'm gobsmacked. It was a love letter to west Texas and the women who live there. It was a pointed finger to the way sexism and racism beat people down until they, as Mary Rose says as she aimed her Winchester, "need to kill someone." The language could be as dry as a tapped oil field at times while rising at others to become as lush and colorful as a sunrise in a place where the horizon stretches forever.”

    Page 158 Books image Jenny, Page 158 Books
  31. The #1 New York Times Bestseller

    Includes six new songs by Jessica Simpson, available exclusively in the Open Book audiobook.

    Performed by the author featuring her music throughout.

    Jessica reveals for the first time her inner monologue and most intimate struggles. Guided by the journals she's kept since age fifteen, and brimming with her unique... Read More »

  32. By Min Jin Lee / Narrated by Allison Hiroto

    Pachinko (National Book Award Finalist)

    “A father's gentle nature, a mother's sacrifice, a daughter's trust, and a son's determination are the cornerstones of this grand, multilayered saga. Pachinko follows one family through an ever-changing cultural landscape, from 1910 Korea to 1989 Japan. As the bonds of family are put to the test in the harsh realities of their world, Sunja and those she holds dear manage to carve themselves a place to call home with hard work, self sacrifice, and a little kimchi. Through it all is a message about love, faith, and the deep-rooted bonds of family. Min Jin Lee gives us a phenomenal story about one family's struggle that resonates with us today. It will take hold of you and not let go!”

    Jennifer Steele image Jennifer Steele, Boswell Book Company
  33. "A glorious fantasy."--Neil Gaiman
    Three-time Hugo Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author N.K. Jemisin crafts her most incredible novel yet, a story of culture, identity, magic, and myths in contemporary New York City.
    In Manhattan, a young grad student gets off the train and realizes he doesn't remember who he is, where he's... Read More »

  34. A Good Neighborhood

    “This moving story, expertly narrated by Adenrele Ojo, is told from the points of view of several main characters, and intermittently by omnipotent unnamed neighbors, after a new family moves into a “good” North Carolina neighborhood. Conflicts arise over the health of an ailing oak tree and a budding romance between two star-crossed teens. Although the story contains alleged and real crimes, and there are perpetrators and victims, it’s the lines between miscommunication and outright lies, latent and blatant racism, bad decisions and criminal acts, and hope and futility that drive the plot. The message for all of us good people: we all can and MUST do better. A Good Neighborhood will appeal to older teens and adults interested in contemporary issues with a twist of a Shakespearian tragedy.”

    Rediscovered Books image Becky, Rediscovered Books
  35. Things in Jars

    “Set in Victorian England, Things in Jars feels like a Sherlock Holmes story, if Holmes had been a woman. You can’t help but love Bridie Devine, a strong-willed, chain-smoking woman who has clawed her way from life as an orphaned thief to a highly sought-after detective often consulted by Scotland Yard. Bridie’s newest case, though, is proving difficult and incredibly strange. Not only will it force her to confront someone from her past who she thought was dead, she’ll also team up with an actual ghost as she solves a fantastical crime. Highly imaginative, Things in Jars is a fun and immersive read.”

    Bookmarks image Jamie Southern, Bookmarks
  36. Long Bright River

    “This story’s power comes not just from its beautiful writing but the reality of its characters and the incisive nature of its setting. Liz Moore has created a masterpiece that exposes the opioid epidemic in Philadelphia, highlighting the vulnerability of its victims and the sheer scope of suffering it causes. From the first page, when the murder mystery begins, readers will suffer and rejoice with the novel’s oh-so-human characters. The power of this story is a fire that will linger for a long time.”

    Hilary Kotecki image Hilary Kotecki, The Doylestown & Lahaska Bookshops
  37. The Song of Achilles

    “It is unbelievably easy to get lost in the long-forgotten world Miller recreates. Easier still with such incredible narration from Douglas. At once rich mythology and modern love story, The Song of Achilles dazzles like Ichor. Beautifully written, with characters you love to hate and love all at once. Though I’ve heard The Iliad many times, this is the version that will stick with me. And I certainly shan’t ever forget Patroclus.”

    Second Star to the Right image Britt, Second Star to the Right
  38. A Gentleman in Moscow

    “Through Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov's ordinary encounters and activities within the bounds of the four walls of post-revolutionary Moscow's Metropol Hotel, where he is under house arrest, Towles deftly guides readers across a century of Russian history, from the Bolshevik uprising to the dawn of the nuclear age under Krushchev. Grandiloquent language and drama reminiscent of Tolstoy gradually give way to action and tradecraft suggestive of le Carre in this lovely and entertaining tale of one man's determination to maintain his dignity and passion for life, even after being stripped of his title, belongings, and freedom. Reading A Gentleman in Moscow is pure pleasure!”

    The Vermont Book Shop image Becky Dayton, The Vermont Book Shop
  39. One of the New York Times 10 Best Books of the Year

    BEST NONFICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR - TIME MAGAZINE

    ONE OF THE BEST 10 BOOKS OF THE YEAR - WASHINGTON POST

    NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

    NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST

    WINNER OF THE ORWELL PRIZE

    LONGLISTED FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD 

    "Masked intruders dragged Jean McConville, a 38-year-old...
    Read More »

  40. Universally acclaimed, rapturously reviewed, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for autobiography, and an instant New York Times bestseller, Chanel Miller's breathtaking memoir "gives readers the privilege of knowing her not just as Emily Doe, but as Chanel Miller the writer, the artist, the survivor, the fighter." (The Wrap).

    "I...
    Read More »

  41. By Richard Powers / Narrated by Suzanne Toren

    The Overstory

    “Do you love trees? Probably not as much as Richard Powers does! This books weaves together the converging stories of nine characters, but they really function as a means to probe the perspective of the trees themselves. With lyrical prose and amazing stories of naturalist history, this is an epic of environmental literature.”

    Avid Bookshop image David, Avid Bookshop
  42. My Dark Vanessa

    “In this gripping debut novel, a teenage girl falls into an affair with her English teacher, who is 30 years her senior. The voice of Vanessa, the narrator, is unparalleled in its honesty, and her emotions are fiercely conveyed with unrelenting realness. This novel is a timely and important read, sometimes difficult, but ultimately an unforgettable experience. You will be left astonished and transformed. Vanessa is formidable and so is her story; you won’t be able to put down this powerhouse of a novel.”

    Luisa Barbano image Luisa Barbano, Oblong Books & Music
  43. Normal People

    “What a treat to discover Sally Rooney! This novel stands out shining from the current onslaught of mediocre prose and less-than-suspenseful thriller plots. Normal People is the story of a relationship between two high school classmates in a small town in Ireland, and how it changes over time, through their last year of college in Dublin. Rooney’s spare and brilliant writing illuminates her insight and makes the unfolding of these two personalities completely compelling.”

    Georgiana Dix Blomberg image Georgiana Dix Blomberg, Magnolia's Bookstore
  44. Deacon King Kong

    Deacon King Kong is a quintessential New York story. Set in the Brooklyn projects in 1969, a perpetually inebriated deacon called Sportcoat aims a gun at the neighborhood’s main drug dealer in the public plaza and pulls the trigger. Incredibly well-constructed and hilarious at times, McBride’s story entwines a number of storylines that are kickstarted by this central event. The local Italian gangster, the veteran cop, the meddling churchgoers, and the drug pushers all have their own agendas, hopes, and dreams that are affected. And though Sportcoat doesn’t remember his actions and is always under the influence of gut-rot moonshine, I couldn’t help but root for him as I was reading this. His delightful ineptitude and absence of clarity made this book impossible for me to put down. If you’ve never read McBride before, this is a great introduction.”

    Novel. image Stuart McCommon, Novel.
  45. The Ten Thousand Doors of January

    “"The Ten Thousand Doors of January" is a story about stories, and about escape, and about adventure. A fantastic tale that follows January Scholar, as she shares the story of the Doors that changed her life. January LaVoy's narration, combined with the portal fantasy aspects of the story sucked me into the ten thousand worlds of the book. An audiobook almost more transformative as a story read aloud.”

    Trident Booksellers and Cafe image Katherine, Trident Booksellers and Cafe
  46. Ninth House

    “The charter of the Leahy house is to manage and police the secret houses of the veil on the campus of Yale University. When a murder is connected to the magical activities of the houses, Galaxy Stern, Alex, the newest member of the Ninth House must find out what happened even if it means losing her place at Yale or her life. Ninth House grips you from the beginning and Alex is a wonderfully crafted edgy protagonist with deep scars. In the pretentious ivy league world Alex tenaciously pursues evil through unexpected twists and turns. If you like mystery and magic this is for you!”

    Avid Bookshop image Ellen, Avid Bookshop
  47. Red, White & Royal Blue

    “Fresh, irreverent, and funny, Red, White & Royal Blue is a delight and a treasure. With subtle jabs, Casey McQuiston pokes fun at both the public face of the British monarchy as well as the back-door politicking that dominates the U.S. political scene. The story follows the self-centered Alex Claremont-Diaz (America’s First Son) and his interactions with British Prince Henry of Wales. As hostility increases between two political scions forced into a sham friendship, we see the framework of political destiny and duty begin to fray. Little by little, hostility turns to something else entirely. This is a story about happiness — and, more importantly, honesty — for those who live their lives in the public eye.”

    The Book Cellar image Todd Ketcham, The Book Cellar
  48. The Body

    “At home while peeling wallpaper or making diner—or just closing my eyes for a while—a non-fiction audio book is a perfect companion, especially if it’s teaching me something as well as being entertaining. The Body: A Guide For Occupants by Bill Bryson, narrated by Bill Bryson, is exactly that kind of book. Bryson’s voice is genial, sometimes humble, and yet informative and authoritative, and I was pleased that he choice to narrate it. And the subject is me! Well, sort of. But what could be more compelling than learning about this body that has taken care of me for, well, many years now. And even the insights that might not relate to me at this moment are fascinating. I kept thinking about my friends and how this book could help me to better understand their aches and pains and medical conditions. And, maybe most importantly, by listening to this book I became amazed at the idea that these bodies of ours do so much to keep us healthy and alive—and to understand how we should be helping our bodies to do so. I’d love to quote all the facts I’ve learned—such as information about viruses, and the odd facts that seem unbelievable, such as the Anton-Babinski syndrome, where people who are blind refuse to believe it—but that’s why you should listen to this book, to find these gems for yourself.”

    Loganberry Books image Sarah, Loganberry Books
  49. The Lager Queen of Minnesota

    “A Minnesota family grounded in farming, beer, and award-winning pies is split for decades when one of two sisters inherits the farm. Helen and Edith — whose stories author J. Ryan Stradal effectively weaves together — stop speaking, while one’s fortunes soar and the other’s plummet. When a woman of the next generation has a chance at success, she may also reunite the Calder family. Stradal brings the heartland to the page with warmth, humor, and plenty of hops-inspired lore.”

    Book Passage image Cheryl McKeon, Book Passage
  50. By Becky Chambers / Narrated by Rachel Dulude

    The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet

    “This gripping, diverse novel, set well after Earth's residents have scattered to Mars, other planets, and itinerant spacecraft, is as scientifically and sociopolitically plausible as any science fiction I've ever read or listened to. The characters, from a variety of alien species along with AI, have wide-ranging journeys that speak to our current reality and to issues of immigration, xenophobia, colonization, economic class, technological advancement, environmentalism, and more. The members of one species are all born female and becomes male later on, of another all use "they" pronouns, and of another are free with their touch and affection and find amusement in human hangups about touch. In the midst of all this complex representation emerges a story that stands alone as cohesive, meaningful, and powerful.”

    A Seat at the Table Books image Emily, A Seat at the Table Books
  51. Disappearing Earth

    “Julia Phillips is an author to watch. She beautifully transports us to a region of the world that I had never heard of and now can’t stop thinking about. The stories of the women there—their family dynamics, their hopes and fears, the economic and cultural divide of various communities—tell a moving story about this place in a moment in time, but ultimately about the universal struggle of women living with the expectations placed on them. A remarkable debut.”

    Bookshop Santa Cruz image Casey Coonerty, Bookshop Santa Cruz
  52. By Mo Rocca / Narrated by Mo Rocca

    Mobituaries

    “I have been enjoying Mobituaries both for the fun of the individual stories and the joy that Mo seems to take in telling them. I don't often recommend a book as the audiobook over hardcover but in this case I think that the audiobook is the way to go.”

    Rediscovered Books image Bruce, Rediscovered Books
  53. "The many listeners enthralled by the earlier two volumes in Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall trilogy will find all their expectations met in this final installment... Here is a narrative achievement of the highest order." — AudioFile Magazine, Earphones Award winner

    This program is read by Ben Miles, who played Thomas Cromwell in the Royal Shakespeare... Read More »

  54. The Library Book

    “There is no one better at investigating the fascinating stories hiding in plain sight than Susan Orlean. The vivid descriptions of the fire that engulfed the Los Angeles Central Library in 1986 are burnished by the meticulous research she did on the history of libraries and on the shocking event that resulted in the destruction and damage of over one million books. The mystery of who would start such a fire is woven between stories of eccentric librarians and the transformation of Los Angeles in the 20th century. From memories of the blissful hours spent in the library of her youth to the historical significance of these repositories of our past, Orlean has crafted a love letter to the importance of the written word and those who devote their lives to its preservation.”

    Book Passage image Luisa Smith, Book Passage
  55. Evvie Drake Starts Over

    “A delightful summer listen. Quick witted and sharp. A rom-com ready to take to the beach and be enjoyed!”

    HearthFire Books and Treats image Mollie, HearthFire Books and Treats
  56. On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous

    “Written as a letter from son to mother, Ocean Vuong's On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous is desolately beautiful. Each carefully crafted sentence builds upon the last, a momentum that carries you through a hundred pages before you remember to take a breath. Bleak, brilliant, it is the book other books will be compared to for years. Honestly, I would have been fine if it had been the last book I ever read.”

    Cody image Cody, Book Culture, @thecodystuart
  57. Based on the extraordinary life of National Book Award-winning author Louise Erdrich’s grandfather who worked as a night watchman and carried the fight against Native dispossession from rural North Dakota all the way to Washington, D.C., this powerful novel explores themes of love and death with lightness and gravity and unfolds with the elegant... Read More »

  58. By Erin Morgenstern / Narrated by Jim Dale

    The Night Circus

    “Scintillating, ethereal, and utterly captivating. And with narration by Jim Dale, who could say no? Morgenstern writes in sparkling prose, slowly weaving tapestries that come together in beautiful, unexpected ways, though when you look back, the stage had been set from the beginning. The Night Circus is a beautiful tale of being open to the magic in the world and choosing your own path through it all. Now if only I knew where the Cirque was making its next stop. Perhaps I'll email the proprietor... ”

    Second Star to the Right image Britt, Second Star to the Right
  59. The Witches Are Coming

    “Lindy West is hilarious and timely in this must-listen audio book! It is more enjoyable because Lindy reads it herself, so the jokes are perfectly timed and hearing her words in her own voice works very well for this book. Round up all your fellow witches and gather your coven, the witches are coming for the patriarchy!”

    Tattered Cover image Chelsea, Tattered Cover
  60. By Nora Ephron / Narrated by Meryl Streep

    Is it possible to write a sidesplitting novel about the breakup of the perfect marriage? If the writer is Nora Ephron, the answer is a resounding yes. For in this inspired confection of adultery, revenge, group therapy, and pot roast, the creator of Sleepless in Seattle reminds us that comedy depends on anguish as surely as a proper gravy... Read More »

  61. From the New York Times bestselling authors of Welcome to Night Vale and It Devours! and the creators of the hit podcast, comes a new novel set in the world of Night Vale and beyond.

    In the town of Night Vale, there’s a faceless old woman who secretly lives in everyone’s home, but no one knows how she got there or where she came from...until... Read More »

  62. Before We Were Yours

    “Based loosely on a very real institution, I was quickly drawn into the story. The narrative went back and forth in time and I could hardly wait to reach the connection between the past and present.”

    Fenton's Open Book image Constance, Fenton's Open Book
  63. Little Weirds

    “Magical, delightful and amusing book of daydreams with a cupful of nonsense.”

    HearthFire Books and Treats image Mollie, HearthFire Books and Treats
  64. Lincoln in the Bardo

    “Saunders' first novel has a steep entry curve. It's not a novel that reveals itself quickly and easily, but if you give it your attention, if you burrow deep into the book, you'll be eminently rewarded. There is a richness and depth of humanity here. There is the strange and wonderful. There is love and grief and mystery all brought together in the story of Abraham Lincoln's dead son, the Civil War, and what may happen to us all after we leave the mortal coil. It's a beautiful and moving book that will stay with you for a long, long while.”

    University Book Store image Jason Vanhee, University Book Store
  65. By Tamsyn Muir / Narrated by Moira Quirk

    Gideon the Ninth

    Gideon the Ninth is an epic science fantasy that if delivered into the hands of enough people will set the world on fire as it hasn’t been since The Hunger Games. Brilliance doesn’t come close to explaining Tamsyn Muir’s narrative where no single word is wasted or her engineering of a world with characters that end up belonging to you wholeheartedly even long after the last page. With fierce independence and hysterical wit, and laced with moments of pure heartbreaking tenderness and loyalty, Gideon and Harrow’s relationship simultaneously digs under your skin and tugs at your heartstrings. I cannot recommend this book highly enough.”

    Nichole Cousins image Nichole Cousins, Still North Books & Bar
  66. The Woman in the Window

    “The Woman in the Window is being touted as one of the hottest releases of early 2018, and with excellent reason. A modern take on Hitchcock's Rear Window, with many nods to classic noir film, A.J. Finn's debut novel is told through the eyes of a narrator trapped inside her beautiful house by a severe case of agoraphobia and separated from her estranged husband and young daughter. She copes with her condition by spying on her neighbors and living vicariously through their drama, until the night she witnesses what appears to be a murder and finds herself swept up in its wake. Once this story gets rolling, it will bowl you over. Fans of psychological thrillers should take note of this banger of a tale!”

    Schuler Books image Whitney Spotts, Schuler Books
  67. Mythos

    “Stephen Fry has dusted off the Greek myths. Starting with the creation and going through all the infights, back-stabbings, and just plain stupid mistakes of the Greek pantheon, he breaths new life into these tales with his characteristic wry humor and witty asides. A great added feature of the video book is that Fry himself reads it, so sit back, turn on your LibroFM-playing device, close your eyes and be prepared to be entertained while learning or relearning the ins and outs of Greek mythology.”

    Galiano Books image Jim, Galiano Books
  68. 2014 National Book Award Finalist

    A New York Times Bestseller


    An audacious, darkly glittering novel set in the eerie days of civilization’s collapse, Station Eleven tells the spellbinding story of a Hollywood star, his would-be savior, and a nomadic group of actors roaming the scattered outposts of the Great Lakes region, risking everything for... Read More »

  69. The untold stories behind The Office, one of the most iconic television shows of the twenty-first century, told by its creators, writers, and actors
     
    When did you last hang out with Jim, Pam, Dwight, Michael, and the rest of Dunder Mifflin? It might have been back in 2013, when the series finale aired . . . or it might have been last night,... Read More »

  70. How We Fight For Our Lives

    “This memoir by black and gay poet Saeed Jones is a visceral coming of age and coming out story. Growing up as an only child to his single mother in Texas and spending summers with his evangelical grandmother in Memphis, Jones struggles to come to terms with his sexuality, to come out of the closet, and to love himself. He wrestles with his fractured identity, learning what it means to be gay in the black community, to be black in the gay community, and to realize that either one on its own is enough to get you killed in a straight, white world. There are passages that will bruise and choke you, but ultimately both Jones and the reader come out of the book all the better for it.”

    The Book Table image Rachel, The Book Table
  71. The Authenticity Project

    “Sometimes, especially in this digital age, we get caught up in the idea that while our lives are a mess, everyone else has got it together. And maybe — as Clare Pooley explores in The Authenticity Project — if we were all just honest about our insecurities and difficulties and worries, it would be easier for people to form stronger bonds. This is a charming book with a sweet love story, but at its heart it’s a reminder that we need each other more than we need our phones.”

    Watermark Books image Melissa Fox, Watermark Books
  72. Winner of the Audiophile Magazine Earphones Award.

    The classic collaboration from the internationally bestselling authors Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, soon to be an original series starring Michael Sheen and David Tennant.

    "Good Omens . . . is something like what would have happened if Thomas Pynchon, Tom Robbins and Don DeLillo had... Read More »

  73. Children of Blood and Bone

    “Children of Blood & Bone, is a story told in a world where magic no longer exists. Years ago, this was not the case. Once, magic and the Gods were celebrated. Now, Diviners (those with Maji blood, but no magic) are treated poorly, and all the Maji have been killed. One of those including our main protagonist, Zélie’s, mother. Determined to find a way to bring back magic, Zélie, along with her brother Tzain, and Orïsha’s only princess, Amari (gone rogue), set out on a quest against all odds. Told from Zélie, Amari and Amari’s brother and crown prince, Inan’s viewpoints, Tomi Adeyemi weaves together a tale so beautifully and tragically relevant, it will leave you craving for answers and more.”

    Vroman's Bookstore image Jen, Vroman's Bookstore
  74. Hollow Kingdom

    “We need more heroes like S.T. — a foul-mouthed, idealistic, moral crow with unquenchable courage — and his sidekick, a befuddled bloodhound. Kira Jane Buxton speaks crow, gull, dog, housecat, and owl with such fluency and poetry that I could not put this book down. Her vision of the zombie apocalypse is a strange and wonderful journey I want to take again and again. I really can’t think of another current novel that conveys such humor, joy, sorrow, and hope so beautifully. Thank you for restoring my faith that this world may live on.”

    River Lights Bookstore image Dena Kurt, River Lights Bookstore
  75. The Topeka School

    “If you've read Lerner's cultishly celebrated first two novels, Leaving the Atocha Station and 10:04, you'll find both familiar and unfamiliar things in his third one. Familiar is the character Adam Gordon, who shares a name with the impishly semiautobiographical hero of Atocha Station and many characteristics with 10:04's unnamed writer narrator too. But The Topeka School is a different beast, expanding into a more traditional form by including Adam's parents, two New York psychologists transplanted into red-state Kansas, as narrators too. And while there are fascinating aspects of Adam's story as a high school debating champ wrestling with teenage prairie masculinity, it's with his parents, full of the knowledge and lingo of psychiatric analysis but still unable to escape the flawed dramas of human relations, that this speech-drunk (and speech-skeptical) story really takes flight.”

    Phinney Books image Tom Nissley, Phinney Books
  76. By Neil Gaiman / Narrated by Neil Gaiman

    Norse Mythology

    “With a voice like warm milk and honey, Neil Gaiman breathes life into his stories Norse Mythology honors the tale’s past, but still has Neil’s distinctive style. Which is then enhanced by Gaiman reading the story aloud. Gaiman is able to create distinct voices for each of his characters, from the sly and cunning Loki, to the short-tempered, impatient warrior Thor. Gaiman took mythology that I already loved, created something even more enchanting. It is a collection of stories I could hear time after time and never grow tired of revisiting.”

    Mysterious Galaxy Books image Victoria, Mysterious Galaxy Books
  77. This Tender Land

    “The work of a master storyteller about the making of a young storyteller, This Tender Land is a coming-of-age novel for the ages. It begins in an isolated Dickensian boarding school in Minnesota during the early years of the Depression, then morphs into the story of four runaways in a canoe à la Huckleberry Finn. On the run from their school headmistress and the law, they encounter other wanderers and escapees from life as they canoe towards St. Louis to find their only known relative and a possible home. Odie, his brother Albert, their schoolmate Mose, and newly orphaned Emmy are unforgettable characters in an unforgiving era. Epic, thrilling, and beautifully written, this is storytelling at its very best.”

    The Bookstore of Glen Ellyn image Renee Barker, The Bookstore of Glen Ellyn
  78. The Third Rainbow Girl

    “The facts are that in the summer of 1980, two young women were hitchhiking in Pocahontas County, West Virginia en route to the annual Rainbow Festival. Their murdered bodies were found in a remote clearing on a remote road. Over the years, multiple people confessed to the murders. Was it a local as many thought? Or an itinerant mass murderer traveling the country, raging against blacks and others? Eisenberg dives deeply into the case after spending time there years later as a Vista volunteer. This engaging book tells the story of the people of this rural county, the history of the area, and the officials who would not let the case die. It is also Emma's story: her time with these people, her loves, and her discontent. It is a stirring addition to the Appalachian story.”

    Blue Willow Bookshop image Valerie, Blue Willow Bookshop
  79. By Hilary Mantel / Narrated by Simon Vance

    The sequel to Hilary Mantel's 2009 Man Booker Prize winner and New York Times bestseller, Wolf Hall delves into the heart of Tudor history with the downfall of Anne Boleyn

    Though he battled for seven years to marry her, Henry is disenchanted with Anne Boleyn. She has failed to give him a son and her sharp intelligence and audacious will alienate... Read More »

  80. A Long Petal of the Sea

    “Isabel Allende’s latest novel couldn’t come at a better time for American readers heading into an election season. With immigration and desperate people seeking asylum as its central narrative thread, the novel reminds us of the uncanny resiliency of the human spirit and the power of love — both of others and of country — to restore and heal. From his awe-inspiring feat in the novel’s opening pages to his persistence in the face of a lifetime of adversity, cardiologist Victor Dalmau will live long and well in readers’ minds.”

    Raven Book Store image Kelly Barth, Raven Book Store
  81. By N. K. Jemisin / Narrated by Robin Miles

    The Fifth Season

    “The Fifth Season is an amazing, dark, and gripping work that will hook you from the first sentence. I cannot express to you how much this book stunned me. Robin's narration is well paced and engaging. While I wish this was a book for everyone to listen to, it isn't; destruction, trauma, and rage follow the women and girls who tell their stories. This book is about the end of the world, that you actually don't want to stop reading.”

    Once Upon A Time image Jessica, Once Upon A Time
  82. Queenie

    “Positively brilliant. I was completely blown away by this debut, in which 25-year-old Queenie Jenkins is navigating a lot. She recently went on break from a long-term relationship, she can’t seem to find her stride at her job with a national newspaper, and she’s constantly trying to figure out how to navigate the various components of her identity. The biggest question of all: Can’t she be loved just because, without her blackness being seen as exotic or a caveat? Candice Carty-Williams’ debut is a completely fresh voice that shines light on a literary perspective frequently overlooked — that of young, black women. An absolute must-read.”

    East City Bookshop image Destinee Hodge, East City Bookshop
  83. As a botanist and professor of plant ecology, Robin Wall Kimmerer has spent a career learning how to ask questions of nature using the tools of science. As a Potawatomi woman, she learned from elders, family, and history that the Potawatomi, as well as a majority of other cultures indigenous to this land, consider plants and animals to be our... Read More »

  84. From former football player and star of The Bachelor and The Bachelorette comes a fascinating and eye-opening behind-the-scenes look at his drama-filled season on the hit reality show.

    Before Colton Underwood captured the hearts of millions on The Bachelor, he was a goofy, socially awkward, overweight adolescent who succeeded on the football... Read More »

  85. By Tom Hanks / Narrated by Tom Hanks

    Uncommon Type

    “Wow! Here is a collection of stories that are at times funny, often moving, and really, really good, if not great. 'Welcome to Mars' is perhaps my favorite. It's Kirk's 19th birthday, and he joins his father to go surfing on what turns out to be a defining day in his life. And then there's 'Alan Bean Plus Four,' which is a hilarious telling of four friends' journey to the moon. Read it. You'll be pleasantly surprised by Tom Hanks' writing.”

    Left Bank Books image Randy Schiller, Left Bank Books
  86. Now a Netflix original series!
    Geralt the Witcher -- revered and hated -- holds the line against the monsters plaguing humanity in this collection of adventures in the NYT bestselling series that inspired the blockbuster video games.
    Geralt is a Witcher, a man whose magic powers, enhanced by long training and a mysterious elixir, have made... Read More »

  87. Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

    “Eleanor Oliphant has quickly become one of my favorite fictional characters, and this novel one of my favorite books. Eleanor is completely original and the right kind of weird. Her life and her past, combined with such kindhearted characters, made for a compulsively readable, heartwarming story that I did not want to put down. I can't wait for this book to come out so many more can fall in love with Eleanor. Highly, highly recommended.”

    Copperfield's Books image Kaitlin Smith, Copperfield's Books
  88. Recollections of My Nonexistence

    “Over Rebecca Solnit’s 30 years of writing, readers like me have fallen in love with her seismic, world-shifting essays, and I was not disappointed by this memoir, her first longform writing in seven years. True to her form, this is a memoir not necessarily of the events of Solnit’s coming of age, but rather the greater influences in her development as a feminist, an activist, and a writer in 1980’s San Francisco. In these pages, Solnit describes the formation of her own powerful voice while interrogating the culture that routinely silences women through violence and disregard. By sharing these formative years, Solnit is sure to inspire and vindicate generations of women of all ages and offer much-needed encouragement to people of all genders to invest in voices long suppressed.”

    Underground Books image Megan Bell, Underground Books
  89. By Ruth Reichl / Narrated by Ruth Reichl

    Save Me the Plums

    “Ruth Reichl's latest memoir is delectable! The audio was superb. For readers who enjoy behind the scenes, travel, and food. Loved it! ”

    Main Street Books Davidson image Jessica, Main Street Books Davidson
  90. From the New York Times bestselling author behind the “joyful, warm, touching” (Jasmine Guillory, New York Times bestselling author) The Unhoneymooners comes a delightfully charming love story about what happens when two assistants tasked with keeping a rocky relationship from explosion start to feel sparks of their own.

    Carey Douglas has worked... Read More »

  91. Docile

    “People will often refer to a book as one that’s ‘unlike anything they’ve ever read before,’ but for maybe the first time in my reading life, I can honestly say that about K.M. Szpara’s Docile. This erotic speculative science fiction novel takes place in a frighteningly plausible future where people become ‘dociles’ — essentially indentured slaves working off debt — and explores themes of consent, capitalism, and the abuse cycle. A visceral reading experience that will challenge, confront, titillate, and disgust, Docile feels like a book we will be talking about for decades.”

    Bookmarks image Caleb Masters, Bookmarks
  92. Red at the Bone

    “ I thoroughly enjoyed the audio book, partially because Woodson’s writing is a joy to listen to, and partially because the different narrators helped keep the story straight. (I was talking to a co-worker who said she was having trouble with this one because she didn’t know which chapter was from which point of view — Woodson, unlike other writers, doesn’t do any favors by telling us at the outset who is narrating, instead making us do the work of figuring it out.) It was short, and to the point, and I liked listening to this one family’s story through the years.”

    Watermark Books image Melissa, Watermark Books
  93. Less (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize)

    “When novelist Arthur Less learns that his longtime boyfriend is marrying another man, he accepts every invitation he's received and travels around the world. This novel of a man facing 50 and looking back at his life and love is an utter delight.”

    Blue Willow Bookshop image Cathy, Blue Willow Bookshop
  94. Sapiens

    “I don't own many books. I read books and give them away. However, I will NOT be giving away my copy of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. It's a keeper! Sapiens was an intense read for me. I found myself taking breaks every dozen pages or so. Not because I was bored - just the opposite. I needed time to let the author's perspective on the history of our species (you, me, us!) sink in. Yuval Noah Harari is irreverent at times and makes mind-blowing assertions in his book. You may not agree with all of his theories, but what he claims will make you see yourself as the animal you are in a refreshing new light. It's even possible that after you read Sapiens your view of the human condition will have shifted dramatically. Superbly translated from the original Hebrew into English by the author himself, Sapiens is accessible to readers of all types of non-fiction and fiction alike.”

    The Bookloft image Catherine, The Bookloft
  95. By Talia Hibbert / Narrated by Adjoa Andoh

    Get a Life, Chloe Brown

    Get a Life, Chloe Brown is such a wonderful, inclusive, body-positive, fun, moving, and steamy book, the kind of novel I want to shove into every person’s hand who says they don’t read romance. Chloe Brown is a plus-size black British woman with chronic illness who is confident, sharp, sarcastic, brilliant, and adorable as hell—and, to my great relief, totally comfortable and happy with her looks and her size. After being temporarily knocked down by her illness, Chloe decides to reclaim her life, so she makes a to-do list: ride a motorcycle, have meaningless sex, go camping, etc. It was such an absolute treat to read a novel about a plus-size woman with a disability having amazing, mind-blowing sex and loving her life. I truly cannot say enough wonderful things about this book, so instead I will just force everyone I know to read it.”

    Bank Square Books image Elissa Sweet, Bank Square Books
  96. Hugo and Nebula Award-winning author Octavia E. Butler paints a stunning portrait of an all-too-believable near future. As with Kindred and her other critically-acclaimed novels, Parable of the Sower skillfully combines startling visionary and socially realistic concepts. God is change. That is the central truth of the Earthseed movement, whose... Read More »

  97. The Girl with the Louding Voice

    “This year is overflowing with phenomenal debuts — including this one from Abi Daré. It tells the story of Adunni, a young girl in Nigeria whose dreams and ambition focus in on one thing: education. In a city where girls like her are looked down upon and considered unworthy, she comes to find that change can begin with even the smallest of voices. This story is the kind that makes you itch: you’ll ache for Adunni, bristle at the people who treat her so unjustly, and yearn for her to succeed. This is a stunning, important, and fascinating first novel.”

    Lindsay Howard image Lindsay Howard, Lark and Owl Booksellers
  98. "Ariel Lawhon delivers in Code Name Hélène. This fully animated portrait of Nancy Wake... will fascinate readers of World War II history and thrill fans of fierce, brash, independent women, alike. A stark exploration of the remarkable difference one person, willing to rise in the face of fear, can make."
    --LISA WINGATE, #1 New York Times...
    Read More »

  99. Spinning Silver

    “When Miryem takes over the family money-lender business from her unsuccessful father, her family's fortune finally starts looking up. However, her reputation for turning silver to gold catches the notice of the feared Staryk (magical ice-beings) who come to test her claim. Meanwhile, a duke plots to marry his daughter to Tsar Mirnatius, who is trapped by a deadly secret. When the girls cross paths, chaos ensues and no one is what they appear. Every moment is action packed and engrossing. Novak does so well weaving the multiple story lines into the novel and showing how a first impression is not always accurate.”

    Undercover Books & Gifts image Darean, Undercover Books & Gifts
  100. Inheritance

    “Who are we? Does who we think we are change when we learn a family secret that alters the source of our identity? Shapiro has explored issues of identity in her previous memoirs, but in her latest she applies her signature candor and heart to a riveting, provocative, and inspiring genealogical mystery and journey of discovery.”

    R.J. Julia Booksellers image Roxanne Coady, R.J. Julia Booksellers
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