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Bestselling Audiobooks

The top 50 audiobooks on Libro.fm based on sales from our 1,000+ partner bookstore locations.

Last Updated •
  1. Becoming

    “I adore our former president and I miss him. Yet I cannot help but be ecstatic that Michelle is coming out with a book about her own life so that I can learn more about this powerful, intelligent, and singularly awesome woman. Barack would be the first to say that his wife is a superstar, and I can’t wait to get my hands on Becoming to read about her in her own words.”

    Bookshop Santa Cruz image Jax, Bookshop Santa Cruz
  2. Educated

    “This memoir is unlike anything I've ever read, yet I fear that there are others who were raised in circumstances like Tara Westover. Westover documents her childhood devoid of education beyond the family's radical, extreme, doomsday religion with chilling detail as if investigating herself as a case study will help explain how she escaped. Highly recommend.”

    Avid Bookshop image Rachel, Avid Bookshop
  3. Where the Crawdads Sing

    “Everyone that Kya has ever known has abandoned her. From the time that she was a young child she is left behind. After the student truancy officers track her down and get her to school the children laugh at her so she retreats to the only place that she feels normal - the marshland of North Carolina. She perseveres when she has every strike against her. She fends for herself and studies the natural surroundings of the marsh carefully. She paints and catalogs her collections, studies animal biology carefully, and becomes more in tune with nature than with the townspeople who call her "The Marsh Girl." Then one day the town's "golden boy" Chase Andrews ends up dead and Kya is the one that is suspected of killing him. The story that unfolds will draw you in - I was consumed with the story to the point where I could think about little else during the day because I had to know what happened next in the book. I laughed, I cried, I did fist pumps when things go well for Kya... this book infected me and I'm still having a tough time with the idea that the book is over. I'll carry these characters and this story with me for a long time.”

    The Bookstore at Fitger's image Jennifer, The Bookstore at Fitger's
  4. There There

    “There There is the kind of book that grabs you from the start and doesn’t let go, even after you’ve turned the last page. It is a work of fiction, but every word of it feels true. Tommy Orange writes with a palpable anger and pain, telling the history of a cultural trauma handed down through generations in the blood and bones and stories of individual lives. He also writes with incredible heart and humor, infusing his characters with a tangible humanity and moments of joy even as they are headed toward tragedy. There There has claimed a permanent spot in my heart despite having broken it, or maybe because it did. I think this may be the best book I’ve ever read.”

    Changing Hands image Heather Weldon, Changing Hands
  5. Black Leopard, Red Wolf

    “If I had to pick one word to describe this book, it would be feral. James creates a fantastical Africa that invokes the violence and brutality of the old world, but wraps it in delicate layers of myth and magic that make the reader want to cozy up to the savagery in order to get a better look. The characters add to the effect, as they are mysterious enough to entice and real enough to despise. The sense of displacement and lack of certainty enforces the message that nothing and nobody in this world can be trusted, not even the self. If people want to call this the African Game of Thrones, I won’t necessarily argue, but I will say that the Tracker and his frenemies would make any of the big baddies in Westeros run for cover with their tail cut off. ”

    Cellar Door Books image Linda Sherman-Nurick, Cellar Door Books
  6. Once Upon a River

    “Time to settle down for a story. It begins, as good stories should, with the rescue of a pair of strangers on a winter night. Though all is not as it seems in Diane Setterfield’s latest, as Once Upon a River quickly delves into a mystery. The young girl was dead when she was pulled from the river, but hours later she begins to breathe. As the story of her revival spreads, more than one member of the village feels mysteriously drawn to her. Could she be their missing child, estranged granddaughter, long-lost sister? Setterfield’s work is the closest an adult can come to settling down for story time, and Once Upon a River has the same magic, timeless, and cozy charm of a tale that has been told through the ages. Simply lovely.”

    Molly Gillespie image Molly Gillespie, Joseph-Beth Booksellers
  7. Calypso

    “We, your concerned booksellers, want to make sure you are in tip-top reading shape before David Sedaris visits Main Street Books. Much like a runner must train for a marathon, you must exercise your sense of humor, so as not to pull something in David's presence. Tune up your funny bone with Me Talk Pretty One Day, Naked, When You Are Engulfed in Flames, or any of the other great Sedaris collections on Libro.fm. ”

    Main Street Books Davidson image Eleanor, Main Street Books Davidson
  8. An American Marriage

    “Tayari Jones comes in fierce with An American Marriage. Delving into the lives of the newly married Roy and Celestial, this is a novel that pulls no punches from beginning to end. I won't ruin the surprise, but they're hit with a harrowing event that will define not only their relationship, but each of their lives, forever. Writing with an intensity and pace worthy of Donna Tartt, Jones yanks us into her characters' lives with a grip that never lets up. I cannot wait to put this in people's hands!”

    Angela Spring image Angela Spring, Duende District
  9. Circe

    “This sweeping tale of the gods and heroes of Greek mythology as seen through the eyes of a minor goddess had me from the first chapter. I listened to this as an audiobook from our audio vendor, Libro.fm. The brilliant narrator was the 29-year-old Welsh film actress, Perdita Weeks.”

    Changing Hands image Bob, Changing Hands
  10. The Library Book

    “The Library Book by Susan Orleans is ostensibly about the Central Los Angeles library fire in 1986 but it is SO much more! Orleans' incredibly well researched and yet personal history and commentary on the public library system in the United States is fascinating on many levels. The mystery surrounding the fire is a story unto itself with an interesting cast of characters including the man who was accused but never convicted of arson. In addition, the personalities of the librarians and administrators of the LA library system are varied and incredibly colorful. Finally, Orleans examines the ever-changing roles of public libraries and how information dissemination and services for the homeless are some of the greatest challenges facing libraries today. I listened to this book on LIBRO and hearing Susan Orleans read was a joy! Really a terrific read for anyone interested in books, libraries, social justice, architecture and even crime drama!”

    Wellesley Books image Phyllis, Wellesley Books
  11. A Gentleman in Moscow

    “I believe A Gentleman In Moscow is without dispute a modern day masterpiece. Towles uses exquisite language to tell the story of Count Rostov, a charming and witty "man of intent", who is confined to a fabulous hotel in Moscow for all his days. But that doesn't stop the count from living a sumptuous and meaningful life and he, in turn, graciously affects all the lives around him. I can't praise this book enough.”

    R.J. Julia Booksellers image Mary , R.J. Julia Booksellers
  12. Unsheltered

    “A brilliant novel set in two different centuries, eras when lies trumped truth and superstition overruled science. Kingsolver illustrates human resiliency with insight, humor, and compassion in this deeply satisfying novel. While showing the cost of leadership built on false promises and lies, it also illustrates the strength of the human spirit with characters who will not be broken by their times. Kingsolver’scharacters, including historical figures Mary Treat and Charles Landis, shine as they make their way through the maze of survival set before them. Great reading.”

    Deon Stonehouse image Deon Stonehouse, Sunriver Books & Music
  13. If you enjoyed The Woman in the Window, then you’ll love The Silent Patient.

    “The Silent Patient is a suspenseful story that reads like a Greek tragedy, bursting with unknowns and sprinkled with exciting twists. It is a brilliant novel written by a man that certainly knows how to write something gripping and dramatic, perfect for readers that liked 'The Woman in the Window". At the center of the story is the mystery that is Alicia Berenson, an incredibly gifted painter that was convicted of murdering her husband six years before the start of the book. According to those close to the Berensons, Alicia and Gabriel had a great marriage and were happy together. Then one day Gabriel was tied to a chair and shot five times in the face. Alicia was found standing over his dead body, his blood splattered on her, and the murder weapon had only her fingerprints; it was enough to arrest her for the murder of her husband of seven years. The media circled over this story not because of the actual crime, but because Alicia stayed silent throughout the trial, not even to speak up in her own defense, and has not uttered a word for the past six years. This not only made her case known nationally, but it landed her in Grove Psychiatric Hospital instead of prison. Years have passed and people have forgotten about Alicia Berenson, everyone except Theo Faber, a troubled psychotherapist that has been obsessed with her case since the very beginning and believes he can help her. When a position opens at the declining Grove Psychiatric Hospital, Theo quits his better-paying job and jumps at the chance to finally work with Alicia and get to the bottom of why she has remained silent for the past six years. It is the chance of a lifetime for him. Alex Michaelides is a talented screenwriter that was inspired by a post graduate course in psychotherapy and working part-time at a secure psychiatric unit, meaning that the writing and structure of this debut novel is brilliantly done, and the story is layered with reality. An excellent read!”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Devin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  14. By Celeste Ng / Narrated by Jennifer Lim

    If you enjoyed We All Love the Beautiful Girls, then you’ll love Little Fires Everywhere.

    “Readers who enjoyed the run away hit Little Fires Everywhere will devour this new, slightly edgier fiction release, We All Love the Beautiful Girls.”

    Anderson's Bookshop image Katie, Anderson's Bookshop
  15. Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

    “Eleanor Oliphant has quickly become one of my favorite fictional characters, and this novel one of my favorite books. Eleanor is completely original and the right kind of weird. Her life and her past, combined with such kindhearted characters, made for a compulsively readable, heartwarming story that I did not want to put down. I can't wait for this book to come out so many more can fall in love with Eleanor. Highly, highly recommended.”

    Copperfield's Books image Kaitlin Smith, Copperfield's Books
  16. Lincoln in the Bardo

    “Saunders' first novel has a steep entry curve. It's not a novel that reveals itself quickly and easily, but if you give it your attention, if you burrow deep into the book, you'll be eminently rewarded. There is a richness and depth of humanity here. There is the strange and wonderful. There is love and grief and mystery all brought together in the story of Abraham Lincoln's dead son, the Civil War, and what may happen to us all after we leave the mortal coil. It's a beautiful and moving book that will stay with you for a long, long while.”

    University Book Store image Jason Vanhee, University Book Store
  17. The Immortalists

    “The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin is a unique story investigating fate and destiny. Four siblings visit a fortune teller whose talent is predicting the date of death for her clients. Does this knowledge at an impressionable age inform life decisions that render the prediction true or is it a hoax? You will get to know these siblings very well as Benjamin traces their lives and their choices. In the end—who really knows what determines when your time on this earth should come to an end? Intriguing.”

    Wellesley Books image Phyllis, Wellesley Books
  18. By Min Jin Lee / Narrated by Allison Hiroto

    Pachinko (National Book Award Finalist)

    “A father's gentle nature, a mother's sacrifice, a daughter's trust, and a son's determination are the cornerstones of this grand, multilayered saga. Pachinko follows one family through an ever-changing cultural landscape, from 1910 Korea to 1989 Japan. As the bonds of family are put to the test in the harsh realities of their world, Sunja and those she holds dear manage to carve themselves a place to call home with hard work, self sacrifice, and a little kimchi. Through it all is a message about love, faith, and the deep-rooted bonds of family. Min Jin Lee gives us a phenomenal story about one family's struggle that resonates with us today. It will take hold of you and not let go!”

    Jennifer Steele image Jennifer Steele, Boswell Book Company
  19. The Tattooist of Auschwitz

    “Just, wow. By the time I got to this novel I had forgotten it was based on true events! The story is overwhelming, all the more for it's truth. All of the turns that seemed so confusing to me, I learned, are a result of Heather Morris' careful and accurate telling of memories born in chaos. Lale and Gita are truly magical. Make sure you follow through to the VERY end!”

    Innisfree Bookshop image Casey, Innisfree Bookshop
  20. By Angie Thomas / Narrated by Bahni Turpin

    The Hate U Give

    “This bestselling, powerful young adult novel about social justice and one teen girl's effort to fight for what is right, will leave you breathless. The narration by Bahni Turpin is hands down the best I've ever heard. This is such an important book it should be required reading for life in general. Or listening. Definitely listening.”

    Tattered Cover image Kristen, Tattered Cover
  21. Heavy

    “"I wanted to write a lie," Kiese Laymon says in the opening pages of his brutal, beautiful memoir, Heavy. The book is written in the second person, addressed to his mother, with whom Laymon shares a turbulent, intimate relationship. She feeds his mind with books, but critiques the way Laymon feeds his body as he struggles with his weight. She is his best friend, yet demands excellence through regular beatings. And yet, Laymon's complicated love for his mother is absolute. It is palpable in his voice as he reads the words he wrote for his mother, as he tells you his story of being a black boy, a black man, in Mississippi and America. This is a book that will knock you flat on your back. This is a book that will make you sob in the grocery store. Laymon had me captivated from the very first word he spoke. It was a privilege to listen.”

    Square Books image Maggie, Square Books
  22. The Witch Elm

    “Reading Tana French means disappearing into another life for a while. Her stories aren’t meant to be slick or flashy, but deliberate, intricate studies of characters and their motivations. The Witch Elm is no different, as it follows the unraveling of Toby starting the night he surprises two burglars in his apartment. As you learn the secrets and weaknesses of Toby and his family, you begin to realize that while finding out what happened is enjoyable and surprising, finding out the how and the why is even better.”

    Avid Bookshop image Tyler Goodson, Avid Bookshop
  23. Magpie Murders

    “Who better than the talented Anthony Horowitz to create this marvelous mystery within a mystery. Yes, we're treated to two mysteries for the price of one: One set in a peaceful village in England during the 1950s with the one and only Detective Atticus Pund taking the case, and the other set in contemporary times with a book editor who becomes an amateur sleuth. Horowitz pays tribute to the golden age of British crime with references to mysteries created by the likes of Dorothy Sayers and Agatha Christie. How many hidden gems can you come up with? A perfect book to read in a cushy chair with a cup of tea (hot or iced).”

    Books & Company image Ken Favell, Books & Company
  24. If you enjoyed A Really Good Day, then you’ll love How to Change Your Mind.

    “Take an over-medicated, moody, middle-aged mother of four, add a month of experimental microdosing with LSD and it makes for A Really Good Day by Ayelet Waldman. This mesmerizing memoir of mental exploration tackles the taboo topic of drug use in our society, the frightening rise of prescription pills and the devastating addictions developing during the War on Drugs. A rollicking ride through the realm of self-realization, Waldman’s creative quest for sanity is painfully honest, hysterically funny and deeply human. I loved it!”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Kristin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  25. Bad Blood

    “Theranos was a startup that set itself apart from the bevy of others in Silicon Valley. Its cause was noble, manufacturing revolutionary medical technology that could run a menu of blood tests on only a finger stick's worth of blood, eliminating the need for large painful needles. There was only one problem: the technology didn't exist. Painstakingly researched but still accessible to the medical layman, Pulitzer prize-winning journalist John Carreyrou investigates the meteoric rise and fall of Theranos, exploring how the company managed to fool the public, investors, board members like George Schultz and Henry Kissinger, and even Barack Obama. A must for true crime podcast fans, especially if you find yourself needing a break from the more gruesome stuff.”

    Square Books image Maggie, Square Books
  26. A struggling novelist travels the world to avoid an awkward wedding in this hilarious Pulitzer Prize-winning novel full of "arresting lyricism and beauty" (The New York Times Book Review).

    WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE
    National Bestseller
    A New York Times Notable Book of 2017
    A Washington Post Top Ten Book of 2017
    A San Francisco Chronicle Top Ten... Read More »

  27. My Sister, the Serial Killer

    My Sister, the Serial Killer is one of the best books to come along in quite a while — fast, funny, and completely engrossing. Oyinkan Braithwaite offers up a tale of Nigerian sisters Ayoola, a beautiful and sociopathic serial killer who destroys boyfriends, aware that all they ever want her for is her appearance, and Korede, a nurse whose average looks leave her continually passed up in preference for Ayoola. Still, taciturn and devoted Korede works hard to cover up her charming sister’s crimes. What will happen when they both fall for the same guy? At once a page-turner and a perversely righteous tale about the emptiness of physical beauty and the superficiality of being charmed by it, My Sister, the Serial Killer is entertaining, provoking, and utterly fascinating!”

    Bookbug image Sarah Sorensen, Bookbug
  28. Maid

    “This was an amazing book about her life and struggles. It was so much better being able to hear the author tell the story. I could feel the despair in her voice and it made the book so much more poignant.”

    Mostly Books image Tricia, Mostly Books
  29. Children of Blood and Bone

    “A sprawling fantasy teeming with deep and meaningful magic. One of the things I like most about this debut is that it raises very real and important issues of our time through multiple character's perspectives. No character is one-dimensional, and every character must learn from failure and introspection to become who they were meant to be.”

    Mysterious Galaxy Books image Kelly, Mysterious Galaxy Books
  30. I'll Be Gone in the Dark

    “An overwhelmingly obsessed Michelle McNamara dissects the decades old trail of tragedy, trauma and ongoing taunts by the elusive East Area Rapist in her investigative crime thriller “I’ll Be Gone in the Dark” published posthumously after her unexpected demise. Dubbed the “Golden State Killer” by McNamara herself, his crime spree started with 50 unsolved rapes before escalating to numerous murders leaving terrorized California residents tense for ten years. A determined McNamara meticulously researches this reign of terror with such precision it’s sure to pry this perpetrators identity out of obscurity and into justice, a suitable ending for this authors’ life.”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Kristin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  31. Inheritance

    “Who are we? Does who we think we are change when we learn a family secret that alters the source of our identity? Shapiro has explored issues of identity in her previous memoirs, but in her latest she applies her signature candor and heart to a riveting, provocative, and inspiring genealogical mystery and journey of discovery.”

    R.J. Julia Booksellers image Roxanne Coady, R.J. Julia Booksellers
  32. The Poet X

    “Getting to listen to the author herself read her poetry, which are clearly a testament to the spoken word and the art of slam, is absolutely the best way to devour this novel-in-verse. Acevedo puts everything into her words, and no one else could do them justice the way she does herself. Despite possible age/cultural/religious differences, any listener will immediately relate to this teenage girl desperately trying to both find herself and her voice, and live up to her family's expectations.”

    Quail Ridge Books image Amber, Quail Ridge Books
  33. Killers of the Flower Moon

    “In "Killers of the Flower Moon", David Grann recounts the tragic tale of the Osage Indian Nations decimation and deceit at the hands of their government appointed guardians. Motivated by money, morally corrupt and masterfully manipulative, the true role of these benevolent benefactors, perpetrators of mass murder, is still a mystery today. Granns detailed, yet deeply disturbing detective work, back to the birth of the FBI and the rise of J. Edgar Hoover, unveils an unimaginable injustice overlooked for 85 years. Let’s not allow this atrocious act against the Osage to slip back into obscurity ever again.”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Kristin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  34. The Woman in the Window

    “The Woman in the Window is being touted as one of the hottest releases of early 2018, and with excellent reason. A modern take on Hitchcock's Rear Window, with many nods to classic noir film, A.J. Finn's debut novel is told through the eyes of a narrator trapped inside her beautiful house by a severe case of agoraphobia and separated from her estranged husband and young daughter. She copes with her condition by spying on her neighbors and living vicariously through their drama, until the night she witnesses what appears to be a murder and finds herself swept up in its wake. Once this story gets rolling, it will bowl you over. Fans of psychological thrillers should take note of this banger of a tale!”

    Schuler Books image Whitney Spotts, Schuler Books
  35. Transcription

    “In Transcription, Kate Atkinson brings the past of mid-20th-century Britian so thoroughly to life that she almost seems to be reporting rather than inventing. Her details are so rich and her hand so certain that, as readers, we are there — we are walking those streets, sitting in those smoky rooms. And, most of all, we are completely caught up in the emotional power of the tensions and fears of that past. With Juliet Armstrong, Atkinson has given us a remarkable addition to the canon of British spies.”

    Rakestraw Books image Michael Barnard, Rakestraw Books
  36. By Kristin Hannah / Narrated by Julia Whelan

    The Great Alone

    “Kristin Hannah's The Great Alone is a powerful, compelling story of survival - survival of the natural elements and of the human spirit. It's 1974, and 13-year-old Leni Allbright lives with her devoted mother, Cora, and abusive father, Ernt, who was a prisoner of war during Vietnam. America is changing after the war, and Ernt thinks their best chance at a fresh start is to move off the grid, to America's last frontier - Alaska. Grizzlies, wolves, and dropping temperatures are Leni's worries outside of her family's cabin, but as Ernt's battle with his demons rages on, it's no safer inside. The result is a beautifully descriptive, heart-wrenching adventure.”

    Hillary Taylor image Hillary Taylor, Lemuria Bookstore
  37. Washington Black

    “From sweltering Barbados to London streets, Arctic ice to Moroccan heat, skies above to depths below, fear to love and back again, again, again. Esi Edugyan’s epic new historical novel follows the young Washington Black from the unrelenting brutality of slavery to the edges of the world as he searches for freedom, finding the complexities of the world, of the heart, and of humanity. A journey that vividly lingers long after turning the last page.”

    Bookshop Santa Cruz image Jocelyn, Bookshop Santa Cruz
  38. The Lost Girls of Paris

    “Pam Jenoff specializes in finding a piece of history that has not been fully explored and that often leaves one thinking truth is stranger than fiction. In The Lost Girls of Paris, she returns to WWII but this time her protagonists are a group of British women recruited to blend into the French countryside and sabotage the Nazi network in preparation for D-Day. The story, told from the perspective of three women, ties up a whodunit in a satisfying knot with a little romance, but it’s really a lot more about women finding out who they are and what role they can play in making a difference in the world.”

    Main Point Books image Cathy Fiebach, Main Point Books
  39. The Song of Achilles

    “A sweeping emotional tale of war, passion, and devastation. You are given insight into a hero's life through the eyes of Patroclus in a way that has never been done before.You may think you know the story of Achilles and Patroclus but I promise you, you don't. Miller is able to ensnare your imagination and capture the human spirit in a way few authors before have been able to do.”

    Anderson's Bookshop image Katrina, Anderson's Bookshop
  40. Red Clocks

    “I never understood what it meant for someone's writing to be 'lyrical' until I picked up Red Clocks. With beautiful prose, Leni Zumas tells the story of a young girl seeking an abortion in a world where abortion is illegal and dangerous; a woman on the quest to have children when in-vitro fertilization is illegal and folks aren't allowed to adopt without a partner; a woman in a dead-end marriage desperate to escape from her husband and children; and a woman considered a witch by most who provides homeopathic reproductive healthcare, including illegal abortions. Zumas beautifully weaves these stories together and gives each individual a strong and unique voice, while also maintaining suspended disbelief. These characters felt real and this world felt possible. I suspect this will be one of the best books published in 2018.”

    BookPeople image Hanna Foster, BookPeople
  41. The Feather Thief

    “The Feather Thief is true crime at its best — a tale starting with the Amazonian explorations of Darwin-era naturalists, rooted in the eccentric sensibilities of Victorian collectors, fueled by the obscure cult of fly-fishing tying, and culminating with a shocking 2009 British Museum heist by a shy American flautist. All of these elements are deftly brought together at a thriller’s pace by author Kirk Johnson, a veteran of the Iraqi reconstruction effort suffering from PTSD, who stumbles across the story while fly-fishing in New Mexico in 2011. I mean, you can’t make this stuff up.”

    Parnassus Books image Keltie, Parnassus Books
  42. By B. A. Shapiro / Narrated by Xe Sands

    The Collector’s Apprentice

    “What enormous fun Barbara Shapiro had in constructing this mini-universe of arts, artists, collectors, and grifters. Loosely based on Barnes Foundation founder Albert C. Barnes and his assistant, Shapiro’s fictional pair — Edwin Bradley, the collector, and the lovely but unlucky Paulien Mertens — flit from Europe to Pennsylvania and back in the 1920s. The joy of The Collector’s Apprentice is infectious as the reader is introduced to the salon of Gertrude Stein and becomes a voyeur of a passionate affair involving the great philanderer Henri Matisse. The Roaring Twenties, a whiff of the Talented Mr. Ripley, and a pinch of sex, murder, and mystery are the ingredients of this art thriller. With her bold brush strokes and vivid colors, Shapiro has created a Gauguin of a novel.”

    Darwin Ellis image Darwin Ellis, Books on the Common
  43. By Angie Thomas / Narrated by Bahni Turpin

    This is the highly anticipated second novel by Angie Thomas, the author of the #1 New York Times bestselling, award-winning The Hate U Give.

    Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least win her first battle. As the daughter of an underground hip hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri’s got... Read More »

  44. An Anonymous Girl

    “Fascinating turns abound in this story, which swirls around characters whose livelihoods are meant to hold them to the very highest of moral standards, including a psychologist conducting a study on morality who finds the perfect subject while she arranges for a duplicitous test of her husband’s fidelity. This book is unrelenting in its tension, but in the best way. I stayed up well past 3:00 a.m. sorting out the very last pages, with no regrets the next day. I highly recommend you keep your eye on Hendricks and Pekkanen, for any project these ladies engage upon will surely delight!”

    Melissa Middleton image Melissa Middleton, Joseph-Beth Booksellers
  45. By Sarah Perry / Narrated by Juanita McMahon

    The Essex Serpent

    “If you love mystery, Victorian England, and exploring the tension between science and religion, you will love The Essex Serpent. Many contemporary authors manage to evoke for readers that experience of reading Jane Austen or Sir Arthur Conan Doyle for the first time. The real miracle of Sarah Perry is that she manages to do so with a completely fresh voice. With beautiful sentences and characters and landscapes so well-crafted you feel you've been there, The Essex Serpent captures the imagination and manages to deliver the sense of wisdom only good literature can.”

    Klindt's Booksellers image Tina Ontiveros, Klindt's Booksellers
  46. What would happen if women suddenly possessed a fierce new power?
    "The Power is our era's The Handmaid's Tale." --Ron Charles, Washington Post
    *WINNER OF THE BAILEYS WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION*
    One of the New York Times's Ten Best Books of the Year One of President Obama's favorite reads of the Year A Los Angeles Times Best Book of the... Read More »

  47. By John Medina / Narrated by John Medina

    Most of us have no idea what's really going on inside our heads. Yet brain scientists have uncovered details every business leader, parent, and teacher should know—like the need for physical activity to get your brain working its best.

    How do we learn? What exactly do sleep and stress do to our brains? Why is multi-tasking a myth? Why is it so... Read More »

  48. By Jane Harper / Narrated by Stephen Shanahan

    The Dry

    “This story of a small town and the secrets it has been protecting for decades is fast-paced and never predictable. In a remote section of rural Australia during an extended drought, devastating weather conditions collide with an unexpected turn of events that ultimately results in the murder of a young family. Bearing the scars of the town's past, Aaron Falk returns home for the funeral and is forced to make a choice between saving himself and facing a secret he has been hiding from for 20 years. This is an amazing debut that I could not put down!”

    East City Bookshop image Dana Gillespie, East City Bookshop
  49. The Death of Mrs. Westaway

    “Does Ruth Ware keep getting better and better? Yes, she does. A down-on-her-luck protagonist, a too-good-to-be-true inheritance, and a creepy old mansion combine for a deliciously suspenseful tale. The plucky heroine, Hal, believes she’s mistakenly been identified as an heir to a great estate, but she decides to play along in the hopes of scamming a couple thousand pounds out of the situation. Once she’s arrived at the reading of the will, she quickly realizes that she is in way over her head. This is a deceptive and suspense-riddled thrill ride!”

    Battenkill Books image Connie Brooks, Battenkill Books
  50. New York Times Bestseller

    A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg

    From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it... Read More »

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